PATA | Contact

All posts tagged EarthCheck

Mario-Hardy-PATAMario Hardy, CEO of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA), speaks with Anula Galewska about the organisation’s commitment to sustainable tourism and what Asia needs to take sustainability to the next level.

Dr. Mario Hardy is Chief Executive Officer, Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA). Dr. Hardy has close to 30 years of combined leadership, corporate development and change management experience. Prior to PATA, Mario worked 14 years for UBM/OAG a business with a focus on data analytics and events for the aviation sector and occupied several leadership roles in London, Beijing and Singapore.

ANULA: PATA actively advocates for sustainable tourism. What is your goal?

MARIO: Our aim is to educate, train and create awareness. We want to educate people from the tourism industry on practical ways of being more environmentally friendly, how they can engage with local communities, and also to inspire people to think about sustainability differently than they were thinking before.

People usually link sustainability with the environment, which of course is very important but shouldn’t be limited to it. Sustainability includes social, economic and cultural aspects, and my feeling is that we don’t address these issues enough. For example, we should educate people as to how tourism can improve the wealth of local communities.

People usually link sustainability with the environment, which of course is very important but shouldn’t be limited to it. Sustainability includes social, economic and cultural aspects, and my feeling is that we don’t address these issues enough.

By  Read the original article here.

Share

Having Your Event be Green and Sustainable

Categories: Green Tips
Comments Off on Having Your Event be Green and Sustainable

green and sustainable eventBringing people together for meetings, often for multiple days at a time, can create a “host” of environmental impacts – from greenhouse gas emissions associated with air and ground travel, to the paper, plastic, and food waste associated with feeding attendees. In fact, Marriott Hotels, estimates that the average three-day meeting attended by 1,000 people produces more than 12 tons of trash, uses 200,000 kilowatts of power, and consumes 100,000 gallons of water (TaigaCompany).

Much of this waste and consequent environmental impact can be avoided by carefully planning and implementing a green plan, which will result in cost savings, better branding, and customer loyalty. According to the Center for Responsible Travel, “Going green” is one of the top trends in the meetings industry.

An increasing number of organizations have begun to adopt sustainable meeting practices. Some organizations call their meetings “green” when they offset their carbon emissions for attendee air travel, or serve vegetarian and seasonal food on reusable tableware. Others establish robust programs that include sustainability practices that encompass the majority of meeting aspects.

Organizing a green meeting doesn’t happen over a night, but there are a lot of simple and easy-to-execute actions you can take. Read more:

Share

EarthCheck debriefing on global carbon reporting and COP21

Categories: Climate, Planet, Recommended Reading
Comments Off on EarthCheck debriefing on global carbon reporting and COP21

EarthCheck logo -COP21On December 12, 2015, 196 nations represented at the 21st United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of Parties (COP21) in Paris, gave their support to what is now known as the ‘Paris Agreement’.

The Paris Agreement has 5 key elements which are centred on the monitoring, recording, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Read more.

by Stewart Moore, CEO, EarthCheck

Stewart Moore, CEO, EarthCheck

Stewart Moore, CEO, EarthCheck

The MICE Sector and Responsible Meetings and Events

In the first part of this two part series, we introduced you to the size and economic importance of the Meetings, Incentives, Conventions, and Events (MICE) sector in the Asia Pacific region. In that blog entry we looked at its direct and indirect economic contribution to host countries and the need to balance economic contributions with social and environmental considerations. We explained the simple steps that an event organiser or venue can take with EarthCheck to deliver more responsible and sustainable events and meetings.

Read more

Share

by Stewart Moore, CEO, EarthCheckStewart Moore, CEO, EarthCheckStewart Moore, CEO, EarthCheck

Welcome to a two part series of entries related to the business events sector, sometimes referred to as the Meetings, Incentives, Conventions, and Events (MICE) sector. Three aspects of this industry will be discussed in this first blog: 1) The economic significance and reach of the sector; 2) Why we need to take action to ensure that economic benefits are balanced with social and environmental outcomes; and 3) What operational systems need to be in place to deliver sustainable meetings and events.

Read more

Share

Local Infrastructure in Australian Tourist Destinations: Modelling Tourism Demand, and Estimating Costs of Water Provision and Operation

Categories: Case Study, Infrastructure, Oceania, Pacific, Survey, Visitors, Waste, Water
Comments Off on Local Infrastructure in Australian Tourist Destinations: Modelling Tourism Demand, and Estimating Costs of Water Provision and Operation
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This research investigates and reviews the options available to fund, provide and operate water and wastewater infrastructure to meet growing tourism needs. This includes identification of costs associated with tourist use of infrastructure and peak capacity requirements. The major benefits include better knowledge and understanding of tourist demands, and the need for water and wastewater infrastructure and analytical tools, enabling councils and other authorities to quantify present and future tourist demands, infrastructure requirements to meet demand, and the associated costs of infrastructure provision and operation.

by Michael AP Taylor, Simon Beecham, Nicholas Holyoak and Ali Hassanli

Download

Share

Understanding Urban Tourism Impacts: An Australian Study 

Categories: Community, Oceania, Residents, Survey, Visitors
Comments Off on Understanding Urban Tourism Impacts: An Australian Study 
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

The study set out to better understand the perceptions and attitudes of urban host communities toward tourists and tourism, and to understand the impacts that were of most concern to these communities in major cities. Outlined below is a summary of key findings from the local government focus groups and community survey.

by Deborah Edwards, Tony Griffin, Bruce Hayllar and Brent Ritchie

Download

 

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This study aims to enhance the understanding of tourist experiences and behaviour in urban destinations by analysing the spatial movements of tourists, identifying the key attributes they are seeking in urban destinations, determining how important these attributes are to their experiences, evaluating how two urban destinations performed in relation to these attributes, and assessing whether there are key differences between different types of visitors to urban destinations. The ultimate aim of this project is to inform and guide the future governance and improved functioning of urban tourism destinations by developing a better understanding of the tourist in such settings.

by Deborah Edwards, Tony Griffin, Bruce Hayllar, Tracey Dickson and Stephen Schweinsberg

Download

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This study found understanding the strategic value and design of collaborative linkages in tourism is likely to play a significant role in ensuring businesses’ competitiveness and supporting the sustainability of destinations. Its objectives were to determine the factors that hinder and/or foster collaboration between tourism and/or non-tourism businesses; identify the respondents’ perceptions of costs, benefits, risks, current barriers, and potential actions to encourage collaboration in and across regions. It then used the information to identify gaps, future opportunities and possible directions for collaboration in regional areas.

by Pascal Tremblay and Aggie Wegner

Download

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This report is a first of its kind in presenting vessel counts based on more than 55 aerial surveys covering 20 different anchor sites and nine classes of vessels over the course of an entire year. Results from this study, based on an overall count of more than 18,000 vessels, provide governmental regulators, tour operators and members of the local community with the first quantitative figures about the type of vessels and the annual use of popular anchor sites and of Eastern Moreton Bay (EMB) as a whole.

by Jan Warnken and Matthew Leon

Download

5 PM

Share