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All posts tagged Conservation

Credit: TED

What if we could save the fishing industry and protect the ocean at the same time? Marine ecologist Enric Sala shares his bold plan to safeguard the high seas — some of the last wild places on earth, which fall outside the jurisdiction of any single country — by creating a giant marine reserve that covers two-thirds of the world’s ocean. By protecting the high seas, Sala believes we will restore the ecological, economic and social benefits of the ocean. “When we can align economic needs with conservation, miracles can happen,” Sala says.

Watch the TED Talk or read the transcript here.

By Enric Sala for TED.

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Credit: Travindy

The Republic of Palau in the Western Pacific has today launched the Palau Pledge, a world-first eco-initiative that asks all inbound visitors to make a compulsory promise, directly to the children of Palau, to preserve their home before they can enter the country.

The Palau Pledge is a new immigration policy that takes effect this December. Palau has become the first country to update its immigration policy and landing procedures to implement such legislation, aimed at preserving its culture and the beauty of its natural environment for future generations. It also hopes that other countries will follow suit to protect the planet for children worldwide.

The Palau Pledge is based on the Palauan tradition of BUL, a moratorium declared by Palau’s traditional leaders that places an immediate halt to the over-consumption or destruction of a species, place or thing.

Find out more about the Palau Pledge by reading the full article here.

By Travindy for Travindy.

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Diana Korner speaking on World Environment Day (Credit: Travindy)

At the end of this month the Seychelles Sustainable Tourism Foundation (SSTF) is holding a conference on sustainable tourism in Small Island Developing Nations, taking place at the University of the Seychelles. We caught up with Diana Korner, one of SSTF’s founders, to find out what the plans are.

Travindy: Why do you consider the Seychelles to have ‘enormous potential to become an international best practice example for sustainable tourism’?

Diana: Seychelles has a vast number of natural assets, like its pristine beaches, tropical forests, mountains and waterfalls and a biodiversity, which can be easily accessed in and around its many (marine) protected areas. There are probably few places in the world where you can just take a 30 minute hike to breathtaking views and find endemic flora and fauna and then 30 minutes later jump into the water and dive with turtles, sharks and other charismatic species. Also, Seychelles already benefits from a reputation internationally for being an ecotourism destination, through its many ongoing, award winning conservation initiatives which are linked to tourism, such as Cousin Island, North Island, or Bird Island among others. As a small island state with a population of 90.000 inhabitants in theory effective changes can easily be implemented with the right mechanisms and people on board.

 

Read the full interview with Diana Korner here.

By Travindy for Travindy.

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Galaxy , Mary’s ‘poler’, navigates the rich ecosystem of the inland delta (Credit: Mary Holland)

Botswana’s government-led anti-poaching unit has become a model for conservation in Africa

“If you provoke them, they will provoke you. If you respect them, they will respect you. With hippos, there are rules,” says Galaxy. He’s referring to the giant mammals that are haphazardly popping their heads out the water, just like the Hungry Hungry Hippos game.

Galaxy is a “poler”. He’s been navigating the Okavango Delta waterways by mokoro (traditional dugout canoe) for over 20 years – something his parents did, too. During the annual flood season, mokoro is the only mode of transport for many locals.

He also partakes in the annual mokoro race, which takes place on 20 October each year and aims to integrate cultural tourism – sharing traditional transportation, art, entertainment and games – with the more popular wildlife tourism. “In Botswana we are proud of tourism,” he tells me as we glide through the reeds past the grunting of the hippos, the dust of the buffalo and the swishing of the distant elephants.

Read the full article on Botswana’s high-quality, low-impact tourism model here.

By Marry Holland for The Independent.

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Credit: Shutterstock

Adam Ruins Everything explains how trophy hunting can actually help animals in the long-run.

Trophy hunters seek out the largest and oldest wild animals to kill and keep as trophies. Hunters say there’s nothing wrong with a well-managed trophy hunt. Hunters pay large fees, which often go toward conservation efforts or the local community—and hunts are often regulated by local authorities to minimize the impact. Critics say trophy hunting is a disgusting act and is completely unnecessary. The numbers don’t add up. What do you think?

 

Read the article and watch Adam Ruins Everything video here to find out. 

 

Posted by The Tylt.

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UNESCO Asia-Pacific Awards

Call for Entries: 2017 UNESCO Asia-Pacific Awards for Cultural Heritage Conservation

20 FEBRUARY, 2017, BANGKOK,– Submissions are now being accepted for the 2017 UNESCO Asia-Pacific Awards for Cultural Heritage Conservation.

The Awards recognize the efforts of private individuals and organizations that have successfully restored or conserved structures, places and properties of heritage value in the region. The Awards emphasize the importance of the conservation process, including the technical achievements and quality of the restoration, as well as its social impact, including community involvement in the project. By UNESCO Bangkok. To find out more please click here.

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Air China bans shark fin cargo, reflecting dramatic shift in attitudes

Categories: Asia, Private Sector, Recommended Reading, Sea, Wildlife
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Air China has become the first airline in mainland China to ban shark fin cargo, marking a dramatic shift in attitudes toward trade in endangered wildlife here and throwing a lifeline to shark populations threatened with imminent extinction.

The news, released late Friday, came just a week after China announced plans to ban its domestic ivory trade, a landmark decision of vital importance in ending an epidemic of elephant poaching in Africa.

It marks the country’s gradual transformation from being the biggest source of the problem — as the largest market in illegal wildlife products — to becoming a major part of the solution. By Simon Denyer. Read more.

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How a lame baby pachyderm inspired an art project that has raised millions for elephant care

After a decade of touring the world to raise funds for Asia’s pachyderms, the Elephant Parade art exhibition is back in Chiang Mai where it all started and celebrating its tenth anniversary with 89 colourful statutes of elephantine tykes on display all around the city. Mike Spits, the co-founder, recently opened the Elephant Parade studio in Chiang Mai, and was happy to share the success story with his supporters. By Phoowadon Duangmee, The Nation. Read more.

The Elephant Parade on display at Maya shopping mall in Chiang Mai province. Photo credit: Phoowadon Duangmee

The Elephant Parade on display at Maya shopping mall in Chiang Mai province. Photo credit: Phoowadon Duangmee

 

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New bird species and giraffe under threat – IUCN Red List

Categories: Americas, Fauna, North, Recommended Reading, Wildlife
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Photo credits: D. McCoy

The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is now threatened with extinction.

Photo credits: IUCN Photo Library, Alicia Wirz

Spring wild oat (Avena fatua) is among the crop wild relative species assessed for this update.

Photo credits: Stephane

Cancun, Mexico, 8 December 2016 (IUCN) – Over 700 newly recognised bird species have been assessed for the latest update of The IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, and 11% of them are threatened with extinction. The update also reveals a devastating decline for the giraffe, driven by habitat loss, civil unrest and illegal hunting. The global giraffe population has plummeted by up to 40% over the last 30 years, and the species has been listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. – By IUCN. Read more.

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Silly Animals for Hump Day Wednesday

Categories: Fauna, Planet, Recommended Reading, Wildlife
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Hump Day Wednesday is here, the dreaded middle of the work week. To help you get over that hill, we present you with our favourite finalists of this year’s Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards featuring cute and silly animals. Enjoy!

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Silly Animals Edward Kopeschny Midland Ontario Phone: 705-528-1636 Email: edkophoto@yahoo.com Title: Mrs Happy Description: One very content snowy owl. Animal: Snowy Owl Location of shot: Minesing, Ontario, Canada

 

Silly Animals Barb D'Arpino Wasaga Beach Phone: 705 429-4592 Email: barbaralynne@rogers.com Title: No butter or salt? Description: Eastern Chipmunk stuffing her cheeks with corn until they looked ready to pop. Animal: Eastern Chipmunk Location of shot: Wasaga Beach, Ontario, Canada

 

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Silly Animals George Dian Balan Brussels Belgium Phone: +32484744195 Email: dian.balan@gmail.com Title: Push Me Pull You Description: Two wide rhinos organised back-to-back in defence formation seem to be the rarest creature in Africa, Push Me Pull You. Animal: wide rhino Location of shot: Laikipia, Kenya

 

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Click here to check out the rest of the finalists!

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