PATA | Contact

All posts tagged climate

Thanks to a camera trap, a polar bear unwittingly makes a self-portrait in Svalbard. PHOTOGRAPH BY PAUL NICKLEN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Lack of sea ice is making it more difficult for polar bears to find food.

When photographer Paul Nicklen and filmmakers from conservation group Sea Legacy arrived on Baffin Island in late summer, they came across a heartbreaking sight: a starving polar bear on its deathbed.

Nicklen is no stranger to bears. From the time he was a child growing up in Canada’s far north the biologist turned wildlife photographer has seen over 3,000 bears in the wild. But the emaciated polar bear, featured in videos Nicklen published to social media on December 5, was one of the most gut-wrenching sights he’s ever seen.

“We stood there crying—filming with tears rolling down our cheeks,” he said.

Read the full article and watch the video here.

By Sarah Gibbens for The National Geographic.

Share
Water Scarcity

Image Source: Yahya Arhab/EPA

According to a new global analysis published in the journal Science Advances this month, water shortage is one of the biggest challenges facing humanity today.

The results are fascinating and the causes are clear. Continuing population growth coupled with increasing food demand is stretching water limits around the world.

It was also interesting how rising incomes have been leading to a change in diets where people are tending to eat meat more regularly.

To read more on this article published in The Guardian Environment Section click here.

Share

The main objectives of this project are to examine regional visitation to Melbourne and its metropolitan parks, to study the main factors that could function as constraints to such visitation and to produce a number of  recommendations, so as to enhance visitation in the future. Parks in this study include those metropolitan parks operated by Parks Victoria in the suburbs and immediate  hinterland of Melbourne. Also grouped with parks for the purpose of this study are major cultural sites like Werribee Mansion and local metropolitan bays and piers like Port Phillip Bay and Frankston Pier.

by Peter Murphy, Sharyn McDonald and Kerasia Seiragaki

Download

Regional Visitation to Melbourne and its Metropolitan Parks, Cultural Assets and Bays

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share

In light of the rapidly growing tourism industry in the region, excessive tourist use of the dune lakes on Fraser Island could deleteriously affect their ecology and in turn, their aesthetic appeal to tourists. The findings from this research study suggest that the current level of tourist pressure on the perched dune lakes on Fraser Island is likely to have a significant long-term impact on the ecological health of these systems.

by Wade Hadwen, Angela Arthington, Stuart Bunn and Thorsten Mosisch

Download

Effects of Tourism on Fraser Islands Dune Lakes

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This report provides a complete summary of the scoping study report which has been undertaken by STCRC, The Impacts of Climate Change on Australian Tourism Destinations: Developing adaptation and response strategies — a scoping study. The goal of the project was to build a framework to inform and prioritise adaptation strategies which can be undertaken by destinations and tourism businesses. To do this, the climate change vulnerability of each destination was assessed, with a focus on the potential impacts on tourism infrastructure, activities and operational costs. Summary chapters highlighting key research, findings and recommendations for each of the case study regions are included in this document.

by STCRC

Download

The Impacts of Climate Change Summary Cover Image

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

Following discussions within the Tourism and Climate Change Taskforce in 2007–2008, STCRC decided to undertook a study of the potential adaptations to climate change in five key tourist destinations in Australia: Kakadu National Park, the Cairns region (including the Great Barrier Reef and Wet Tropics rainforest), the Blue Mountains, the Barossa Valley and the Victorian Alps.  The research project examines existing knowledge on anticipated biophysical changes and, through primary research (stakeholder interviews and social learning workshops), gauges the expected adaptive approaches of destination communities and the tourism sector to these changes for 2020, 2050 and 2070. It then estimates likely economic consequences. This technical report presents the research findings in full and supports the summary developed by STCRC.

by Stephen Turton, Wade Hadwen and Robyn Wilson (editors)

Download

Download

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

The National Climate Change Adaptation Framework identified tourism as one key sector vulnerable to the impacts of climate change in Australia. This paper evaluates how nine government tourism agencies are responding to the issue of climate change in Australia.     It critically evaluates how government tourism agencies are addressing climate change issues, by promoting carbon reduction initiatives and carbon offsetting schemes for tourism operators.

by Heather Zeppel & Narelle Beaumont, University of Southern Queensland Australian Centre for Sustainable Business & Development

Download

Share

Davos Declaration: Climate Change and Tourism Responding to Global Challenges

Categories: Uncategorized
Comments Off on Davos Declaration: Climate Change and Tourism Responding to Global Challenges

Signed at the 2nd International Conference on Climate Change and Tourism in Davos, Switzerland on 3 October 2007, The Davos Declaration underscores that the tourism sector must rapidly respond to climate change, within the evolving UN framework if it is to grow in a sustainable manner. The Declaration recognises that tourism sector has an important place in that framework, given its global economic and social value, its role in sustainable development and its strong relationships with climate.

UNWTO Davos Declaration

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share