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Air travel has an impact on both our own health as well as our planet’s. When we think about it – the carbon emissions resulting from it as well as the waste produced, or jet-lag – it may not be the healthiest choice after all. However, there are many ways to make your long-haul flight a better experience by considering the environmental impact, your health, and your sleep cycle.

Book an eco-friendly flight and check whether your airline offers carbon offset programs. You can learn more about offsetting your global travels via PATA partner EarthCheck’s carbon calculator here. Be sure to check out our previous tips on how to reduce your carbon footprint and make the most of your air miles.

When getting ready for your journey at home, start with packing eco-friendly travel essentials that allow you to produce zero waste on your next long flight. For example, bring your own empty water bottle(s) to refill at an airport water fountain after passing security and carry your own slow-energy release snacks (e.g. nuts or dried fruits) in a reusable container or environmental friendly packaging. Drink plenty of water two days before traveling and get some exercise if possible. Bring a thermo flask if you like to drink coffee or tea to avoid disposable cups, both at the airport and on the plane. Little changes and a mindful preparation for your flight can have a positive impact on our earth.

At the terminal, stretch your legs and walk around the terminal before boarding. Remember to refill your water bottles to stay well hydrated during the flight. Choose what works best for you to stay healthy on your travels. By avoiding single-use water bottles, cups or disposable cutlery throughout your travels you will also reduce plastic waste in which our oceans and other places around the world are drowning in.

On board, choose to say ‘No’ to all items that are wrapped in plastic on board, from the headphones to the toiletry bag to minimise waste. Move around the plane, wiggle your feet and toes to keep the blood circulating. Lower your window shades to help keep the aircraft cool. You may even want to consider fasting on a long-haul flight to avoid or reduce jet lag. Read more about three good reasons to fast here.

Ready for take-off? Enjoy your flight and stay green.

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Credit: “Instant Vacation: 2018’s best travel photos” on cnn.com – In this aerial photo taken on April 1, 2018, a group of children join a learning tour to experience tea-picking in Meitan County of Zunyi, southwest China’s Guizhou Province. (Xinhua/Yang Wenbin) (lmm)

Some gases, including carbon dioxide and methane, trap heat in the atmosphere, producing a “greenhouse effect,” and so make the planet warmer. The amount of greenhouse gases released by a particular activity is referred to as its “carbon footprint.”
The increasing carbon footprint of global tourism between 2009 and 2013 represents a 3% annual growth in emissions, according to University of Sydney researchers.
Their paper was published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change.
Overall, the US tops the carbon footprint ranking, followed by China, Germany and India, Malik and her colleagues estimate. Domestic travel, which includes business travel, makes up a majority of the carbon footprints for each of these countries.
Read the full article here.
By Susan Scutti for CNN.
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Credit: Shutterstock

Guest blogger Jackie Edwards gives tips for sustainable hair and skincare when traveling:

The tide of sustainable travel is rising in Asia, thanks to savvy hoteliers who are in tune with the modern traveler’s wishes to experience the beauty of the world without leaving a huge carbon footprint. Sustainability involves everything from water recycling right through to activities such as tree planting or beach clean-ups. Conscientious travelers are taking it a step further by ensuring their skin and beauty routines are not polluting waterways or using environmentally harmful packaging. In this post, we highlight just a few ways that beauty and sustainability during don’t have to be mutually exclusive concepts when traveling.

Packaging and content of personal care items

When buying creams and serums to take along with you on your trip, ensure that as many products as possible come in biodegradable, compostable or plantable packaging and that they don’t contain chemical ingredients that are harmful to you and the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified personal care products and pharmaceuticals as “emerging contaminants of concern” for fish. These chemicals can lead to various diseases in sea life, which are in turn consumed by other animals up the food chain. Do your share for the environment when shopping for personal care items abroad by avoiding products containing toxic ingredients, some of the most common of which include phthalates, sulfates, and parabens.

Opting for a natural look

Those with long, multi-ethnic hair can choose a perm over natural hair as a way to reduce the need for styling while traveling the globe. While styling curly hair can be more challenging than ‘relaxed’ hair, perms can affect our health and the environment, as toxic chemicals used in these treatments can once again make their way into our water system, affecting fish and other marine life.

One study by Women’s Voices for the Earth (WVE) found that long-term exposure to products commonly used in hair salons leads to a plethora of negative health conditions frequently faced by salon workers.

Styling curly hair and having beautifully defined curls is easy. It requires two main things: deep moisturization, and a hair diffuser, which is used to give curls an extra bounce. Forego shampooing and use a conditioner instead. While conditioning hair in the shower, add a little olive, coconut, or argan oil and rinse out afterward. For an extra moisture boost, add a bit more oil, comb hair out and voila! You won’t even need to dry your hair afterward.

For makeup, try replacing your favorite commercial brands with mineral makeup brands, which possess beautiful textures and long-lasting power, much like best-selling brands.

DIY beauty

You can make a plethora of travel products yourself and if you use fragrant essential oils, we guarantee you will become hooked on the quality of what you produce. Think exfoliants made by mixing coconut oil with rock salt or sugar, or homemade deodorant made by blending a tablespoon of shea butter, a teaspoon of baking powder and few drops of an essential oil like lemon or bergamot. Think of how much plastic you will be saving by foregoing store-bought versions.

Reuse and recycle

Do you remove makeup with disposable wipes? There is no need to do so when you can do a much better job with a piece of cloth (cut up into squares) and a dab of micellar water, which removes even the toughest makeup products.

To remain beautiful while on the go, try to balance practicality and rapidity with mindful use of resources. Reuse materials when you can, make your own products to go, and support brands that care for the environment and support the causes that mean something to you.

 

Interested in learning more about DIY beauty? Find out how to use coffee grounds in your beauty routine. We’ve also got some great tips on eco-friendly travel essentials for you here. Be sure to check out PATA’s Responsible Business Travel Guidelines for more information about being a responsible traveller before, during and after your trip.

See more of Jackie’s writing: 

A little closer to home: sustainable everyday life choices

A guide to sustainable travel for seniors

Beginning at home – the next generation of sustainable travelers

How to choose an eco-friendly hotel

Greening the air inside of your home

 

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The aviation industry is responsible for two percent of global emissions. If you care about the environment but also love travelling you can help to reduce your impact by utilising your airline loyalty mileage.

 

Buying carbon offsets

Choose an airline that offers carbon offsetting opportunities. The majority of airlines, including major carriers such as United and Thai, offer voluntary carbon offsets when selling tickets so that customers may elect to compensate by supporting a carbon reduction project.

 

More information on carbon emission calculations is provided by the International Air Transport Association’s Carbon Offset Programme. Read more about carbon offset programmes here.

 

Donating mileage and reward points

Donate your air miles to environmental charities such as carbonfund.org which helps people and businesses to reduce and offset climate impact. You may also donate your miles to initiatives such as Cathay Pacific’s FLY greener programme.

 

You can also buy carbon offsets from projects that reduce CO2 emissions. This is an excellent way of utilising your loyalty mileage before the expiration date. Programmes may also be available for businesses and for cargo shipments.  Get ideas as about how you can donate your air miles.

 

Using mileage for eco-friendly products

Look for programmes that enable you to use your air miles for products that are environmentally friendly. For example, Air Canada’s My Planet programme allows customers to use rewards and points to purchase eco-friendly products and services – from electric scooters to organic cotton sheets.

 

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Insetting rather than simply Offsetting your carbon footprint

Categories: Green Tips
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Insetting rather than simply Offsetting

Image Source: theguardian

Almost everyone nowadays is familiar with carbon offsetting – but there are other ways, starting at grassroots level, to reduce and compensate for your businesses carbon footprint.

Have you heard of Insetting? Do you know how it works and how far it can be a better alternative to simply offsetting your carbon emissions at the end of the day?

Offsetting is an easy solution for organisations to demonstrate commitment to the environment, to ‘polish’ their image and to show they do consider the impact of their daily operations. It also demonstrates their willingness to pay back to the planet, for example by planting trees through a reputable third party.

Consider taking your step to another level by Insetting rather than simply Offsetting your Carbon Footprint.

By offsetting carbon emissions organisations are, essentially, only supporting environmental or social projects; they are not required to gain deeper insights into the causes they support. Insetting refers to the implementation of supportive agreements, projects and contributions internally, such as into the supply chain. This concept requires organisations to have more knowledge about the projects themselves and how their support reaches its target.

Plan Vivo and Pur Projet are two examples of sustainability standards, working to drive the powerful concept of Insetting that, in the long run, may benefit not only the environment but businesses as well.

Have a look at Plan Vivo’s Insetting User Guide for better understanding of how this concept can work.

And let Pur Projet explain further to you what Insetting is about!

Is ‘Insetting’ the New ‘Offsetting’? – published by ecometrica press

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Offset Your Carbon Footprint

Image Source: RESET

Most measures to take, in order to reduce your carbon footprint, are commonly known. You should, for example:

  • Use cleaner transport
  • Implement energy-saving features to your office/home
  • Change your energy & water consumption habits
  • Reduce your food & good footprint

For more details on ways to reduce your ecological footprint visit RESET.

But how can you offset the emissions that you can’t reduce?

Carbon offset projects are certified projects that are proven to reduce emissions in a way that would not have been possible without the project. As an individual or a firm you can donate to and support these projects. Carbon offsets can be, for example, tree planting or investing in renewable energy.

There are various projects offered by different organizations, here are just a few to give you a better idea of what offset projects can look like and how offsetting your emissions works:

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Is it even worth talking about sustainability in tourism when transportation, the cornerstone of travel, significantly damages the environment? Explore this question with us. Peter Berg Schmidt. Read more.

Tourism Sustainability a Contradiction

You don’t need super powers to add a dose of sustainability to your holiday. Check out this sustainable tourism guide and infographic. These travel tips can easily be incorporated in your trip. Peter Berg Schmidt. Read more.

Practical Tips for Sustainable Travel

Image credits: unuk

Starwood

20 April 2015 – Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. recently announced its partnership with NRG Energy, Inc. to make its properties run on green energy.
The Phoenician is just one example of the difference energy efficiency can make… Ainsley Despain. Read more.

 

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In 2007, Elopak commissioned environmental consulting company, Bergfald & Co and Deloitte, to measure and audit its carbon footprint. Emission data from 13 manufacturing units and 40 sales offices were assessed. With this knowledge as a baseline, they drew up a commitment to reduce carbon emissions from operations by 15% by the end of 2010.

by www.rtcc.org

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Defining Business Commitment - Elopak: Packaging CO2

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