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Severe bleaching last year on the northern Great Barrier Reef affected even the largest and oldest corals, like this slow-growing Porites colony.
TERRY HUGHES ET AL. / NATURE

SYDNEY, Australia — The Great Barrier Reef in Australia has long been one of the world’s most magnificent natural wonders, so enormous it can be seen from space, so beautiful it can move visitors to tears.

But the reef, and the profusion of sea creatures living near it, are in profound trouble.

Huge sections of the Great Barrier Reef, stretching across hundreds of miles of its most pristine northern sector, were recently found to be dead, killed last year by overheated seawater. More southerly sections around the middle of the reef that barely escaped then are bleaching now, a potential precursor to another die-off that could rob some of the reef’s most visited areas of color and life. Read more here.

From The New York Times. By Damien Cave and Justin Gillis.

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October 30 2015 – STA Travel Australia is working with charitable organisation, Soles4Souls Australia to raise awareness of the struggles facing disadvantaged men, women and children both locally and abroad, and encourage people to donate their kicks for a cause. Tara Sena-Becker Read more.

Local Infrastructure in Australian Tourist Destinations: Modelling Tourism Demand, and Estimating Costs of Water Provision and Operation

Categories: Case Study, Infrastructure, Oceania, Pacific, Survey, Visitors, Waste, Water
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This research investigates and reviews the options available to fund, provide and operate water and wastewater infrastructure to meet growing tourism needs. This includes identification of costs associated with tourist use of infrastructure and peak capacity requirements. The major benefits include better knowledge and understanding of tourist demands, and the need for water and wastewater infrastructure and analytical tools, enabling councils and other authorities to quantify present and future tourist demands, infrastructure requirements to meet demand, and the associated costs of infrastructure provision and operation.

by Michael AP Taylor, Simon Beecham, Nicholas Holyoak and Ali Hassanli

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Understanding Urban Tourism Impacts: An Australian Study 

Categories: Community, Oceania, Residents, Survey, Visitors
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The study set out to better understand the perceptions and attitudes of urban host communities toward tourists and tourism, and to understand the impacts that were of most concern to these communities in major cities. Outlined below is a summary of key findings from the local government focus groups and community survey.

by Deborah Edwards, Tony Griffin, Bruce Hayllar and Brent Ritchie

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This study aims to enhance the understanding of tourist experiences and behaviour in urban destinations by analysing the spatial movements of tourists, identifying the key attributes they are seeking in urban destinations, determining how important these attributes are to their experiences, evaluating how two urban destinations performed in relation to these attributes, and assessing whether there are key differences between different types of visitors to urban destinations. The ultimate aim of this project is to inform and guide the future governance and improved functioning of urban tourism destinations by developing a better understanding of the tourist in such settings.

by Deborah Edwards, Tony Griffin, Bruce Hayllar, Tracey Dickson and Stephen Schweinsberg

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This study found understanding the strategic value and design of collaborative linkages in tourism is likely to play a significant role in ensuring businesses’ competitiveness and supporting the sustainability of destinations. Its objectives were to determine the factors that hinder and/or foster collaboration between tourism and/or non-tourism businesses; identify the respondents’ perceptions of costs, benefits, risks, current barriers, and potential actions to encourage collaboration in and across regions. It then used the information to identify gaps, future opportunities and possible directions for collaboration in regional areas.

by Pascal Tremblay and Aggie Wegner

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This report is a first of its kind in presenting vessel counts based on more than 55 aerial surveys covering 20 different anchor sites and nine classes of vessels over the course of an entire year. Results from this study, based on an overall count of more than 18,000 vessels, provide governmental regulators, tour operators and members of the local community with the first quantitative figures about the type of vessels and the annual use of popular anchor sites and of Eastern Moreton Bay (EMB) as a whole.

by Jan Warnken and Matthew Leon

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The first Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism Conference was held in Darwin, on the traditional lands of the Larrakia people on the 28th – 30th March 2012. There were 191 delegates from 16 countries representing Indigenous communities, government agencies, the tourism industry and supporting bodies, resolved to adopt principles to guide the development of Indigenous tourism through the following declaration.

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The Larrakia Declaration on the Development of Indigenous Tourism

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This report provides estimates of the contribution of tourism to the economy of South Australia. It replaces an earlier report released in March 2007. The estimates from the earlier report have been revised to reflect revisions to benchmark national data, which were incorporated in the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) National Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) released on 11 May 2007.

 

by Ray Spurr, Thiep Van Ho, Peter Forsyth, Larry Dwyer, Daniel Pambudi, and Serajul Hoque

TSA-SA

 

 

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