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Air travel has an impact on both our own health as well as our planet’s. When we think about it – the carbon emissions resulting from it as well as the waste produced, or jet-lag – it may not be the healthiest choice after all. However, there are many ways to make your long-haul flight a better experience by considering the environmental impact, your health, and your sleep cycle.

Book an eco-friendly flight and check whether your airline offers carbon offset programs. You can learn more about offsetting your global travels via PATA partner EarthCheck’s carbon calculator here. Be sure to check out our previous tips on how to reduce your carbon footprint and make the most of your air miles.

When getting ready for your journey at home, start with packing eco-friendly travel essentials that allow you to produce zero waste on your next long flight. For example, bring your own empty water bottle(s) to refill at an airport water fountain after passing security and carry your own slow-energy release snacks (e.g. nuts or dried fruits) in a reusable container or environmental friendly packaging. Drink plenty of water two days before traveling and get some exercise if possible. Bring a thermo flask if you like to drink coffee or tea to avoid disposable cups, both at the airport and on the plane. Little changes and a mindful preparation for your flight can have a positive impact on our earth.

At the terminal, stretch your legs and walk around the terminal before boarding. Remember to refill your water bottles to stay well hydrated during the flight. Choose what works best for you to stay healthy on your travels. By avoiding single-use water bottles, cups or disposable cutlery throughout your travels you will also reduce plastic waste in which our oceans and other places around the world are drowning in.

On board, choose to say ‘No’ to all items that are wrapped in plastic on board, from the headphones to the toiletry bag to minimise waste. Move around the plane, wiggle your feet and toes to keep the blood circulating. Lower your window shades to help keep the aircraft cool. You may even want to consider fasting on a long-haul flight to avoid or reduce jet lag. Read more about three good reasons to fast here.

Ready for take-off? Enjoy your flight and stay green.

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Credit: unknown on Travel Weekly

Heathrow plans to cut and recycle all single-use coffee cups collected from more 20 outlets and lounges as part of a longer-term ambition to phase out single-use plastics.

The airport estimates that its 78 million annual passengers use more than 13.5 million disposable coffee cups.

The London hub has set a target to standardise and recycle all single-use coffee cups by the end of the year and continue efforts to completely rid staff areas of these cups.

Read the full article here.

By Phil Davies

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TaxiBot in action at Frankfurt Airport. Driven by electric motors, the tractors are real powerhouses — the narrow-body model has around 500 kilowatts of drive output (approximately 800 hp). Credit: Lufthansa LEOS

 

Until now, airplanes have had to use their own turbines to travel from the gate to the runway. But thanks to drive technology from Siemens, an all-new diesel-electric towing tractor controlled from a plane’s cockpit can now perform this task. Known as TaxiBots, the tractors save fuel, extend maintenance intervals, and cut noise. Already certified for the Airbus 320, TaxiBots will soon be able to safely pull about 70 percent of all the passenger planes worldwide.

Read the full article on this environmentally friendly taxiing solution here.

By Christine Rüth and Sebastian Webel for Siemens’ Pictures of the Future.

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Airport wildlife tracking tool launched to combat illegal wildlife trade

Categories: Planet, Recommended Reading, Wildlife, Wildlife
Comments Off on Airport wildlife tracking tool launched to combat illegal wildlife trade

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has announced the launch of an Airport Wildlife Trafficking Assessment Tool which aims to help defeat smugglers of endangered species. Developed in partnership with the World Customs Organization (WCO) with support from the USAID ROUTES Partnership, the assessment tool is being piloted at Mozambique’s Maputo International Airport in November 2016. A global rollout is planned for 2017. The tool helps airports assess their supply-chain security, intelligence and risk management, staff awareness, and reporting processes, alongside air cargo and passenger screening policy and procedures.

Find more information at the Wildlife section of the IATA website. Read more on Travindy. 

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October 26 2015 – Indigenous communities are protesting the expansion of Suriname’s international airport. The airport has obtained title to the neighbouring, indigenous land, and wants to expell most of the population of the Arawak villages Hollandse Kamp and Witsanti. Indigenous people reject the airport’s claim that they are the trespassers. Jeremy Smith Read more.

 

October 8 2015 – Designed to promote New York agriculture and add a bit more green space to the airport, the 24,000-square-foot T5 farm is growing produce, herbs and the same blue potatoes used to make the Terra Blues potato chips JetBlue offers year-round as complimentary snacks to passengers during flights. Harriet Baskas Read more.

 

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Air

20 April 2015 – BRUSSELS, HONG KONG, CASABLANCA, WASHINGTON DC and LIMA: With the groundswell of political visibility and a number of key events about Climate Change building up to the COP21 climate negotiations later this year, the independent programme Airport Carbon Accreditation today provided an update on its progress since going global in 2014. Vicky Karantzavelou. Read more.

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This case study looks at how Whitsunday Coast Airport’s Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Whitsunday Coast Airport

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This case study looks at how sailing adventure company Maxi Action’s Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Maxi Action

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This case looks at how Great Barrier Reef Airport, Hamilton Island’s Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Great Barrier Reef Airport, Hamilton Island

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